Posts Tagged: creative

2010 Global Migration – Double Paper Pie Chart

An interactive/hand-made paper pie chart about The 2010 Global Emigration and Immigration.

How to play: drag the sliders. Go to the end of the sliders to exit and be able to explore another slider, or when you see the >> marks, go there and explore further.

flash here

The visualization presents the 2010 global emigration and immigration, by showing the top 30 countries by the number of emigrants/immigrants, and all the rest of the world grouped by geographic regions, and shows where and how many people are migrating for each of these countries/regions.

It is also a work about data visualization in general, as I was exploring the relationships between different type of graphs, and how the information can flow, naturally, from one type of graph to another, in this case, from a flow diagram into 2 pie charts. To emphasize this, I chose to make it in traditional media (paint and paper); Then I had to bring it back into the digital world and program the interaction, so you can see it.

Enjoy exploring :)

Details and making-of:

2010 Global Migration Paper Pie Chart - vertical viewsPainting viz2010 Global Migration Paper Pie Chart - Detail 52010 Global Migration Paper Pie Chart - Detail 32010 Global Migration Paper Pie Chart - Detail 42010 Global Migration Paper Pie Chart - Detail 1 2010 Global Migration Paper Pie Chart - Detail 2

UN Global Pulse – The voices of the vulnerable

My entry for the UN Global Pulse – Visualizing the voices of the vulnerable challenge on visualizing.org.

Optimized for HTML5 supporting browsers, specially Firefox. In Safari browser the arrows don’t work well, please scroll with your mouse instead.

View the visualization.

More information:

In the – Country’s Economy vs Meeting your Household Needs – graphs, I showed also the relationships between those answers. This might give us a clue of the relevance of the answers, because those who answered that the economy is much worse but they do better at their household might have a reason not related to the global crises for doing better, or were too subjective.

The part about – Relevant things that people talk about – tries to capture the pulse of the surveyed people about dealing with the household problems and about their quality of life (I chose to treat these to questions together as the answers completed each other in very many cases, the quality of life is also explored further in the graphs below this section). Many answers contained information about more than one issue, therefore they were included in many circles.
The whole graph is not a breakdown of what % of the population thinks or does, it’s actually more similar to a word cloud, it’s an issue cloud. Also, I have included some issues that appeared only few times but I believe some of them are relevant and may give important clues about what the majority talked about, but didn’t mentioned it.

A special case it’s Ukraine, where about 2 thirds mentioned the word “Change” with different attitudes, (from No change, to a change is highly needed, a change is visible) and many more talked about it with other words. Only few said “A change of power” or a “Change of government”, “Justice for the people”, although few, I believe they are very relevant and give “Change” a political meaning besides the economical one.

In order to make the wordclouds about the future, I had grouped together similar words (like change and changing), treated as an expression groups of few words that had a meaning like that, and regarding the answers that were phrases with many words, I had included them in the one word that summed up best the phrase (not necessary written in the phrase, but had the meaning of the phrase). For example, in India, many people told what profession they want to have in future, I grouped them as “profession” so that their plans about careers would show up in the cloud.

The Individual CO2 Paper Pie Chart

Individual CO2 emissions (for USA) vs. how to reduce them.

The pollution data is organized in the shape of letter C, the remaining part, can be expanded to form a circle, O, revealing tips for reducing the CO2 emissions, and facts about the tree’s role in reducing CO2.

The more the O expand, the smaller the C is.

Made on printed colored paper, stitched, glued, then photographed.


CO2-PAPER-PIE-CHART

More Images:

trees and air detailsdetail greenco2 detailco2 3rd chartthe pie chart in its natural formmaking of the pie chart


The Paper Pie Chart on Paper

A pie chart about paper made from paper :) .

the paper pie chart

the paper pie chart - detail