Posts Tagged: infographic

Information Graphics by TASCHEN

I just received the new information design book from Taschen:
“Information Graphics” by Sandra Rendgen, edited by Julius Wiedemann.

I am happy to have 1 infographic included in it.


When I received it, my first reaction was, “This book is gigantic! :)”, it is, indeed, with it’s 480 A3 pages, and the huge amount of information in it – in the form of essays and of course, diagrams and infographics – which are very easy to be read because of the size of the pages, and some of them even expanding on 4 pages, folded within the book.

I definitely have a lot to learn from it!

The book launches Monday, April 16th at Taschen’s London store (12 Duke Of York Square in Chelsea), but it’s already a big success, as it is the #1 pre-orders at Graphic Books on Amazon.

Below I’ve added a link where you can buy it from Book Depository, as I prefer it, simply because they sell books with free shipping anywhere in the world.

buy the book from The Book Depository, free delivery

Visual Storytelling


Visual Storytelling is a new dataviz book by Gestalten, which includes 2 of my works: The Paper Pie Chart, and The Individual CO2 Paper Pie Chart.
The photographs below are taken by me in the same park I photographed the paper pie chart, a year ago.


There is so much creativity in this book!!!

buy the book from The Book Depository, free delivery

Stock Check – the world’s non-renewable resources

My entry for the Information is Beautiful Awards – First Challange, a visualization about the world’s non-renewable resources – how long might they last?

Switch the buttons “Grows” and “doesn’t grow” to view the estimates of years ramaining for these minerals and fuels, if the production continues to grow at the rate it grew in the past 10 years; and what difference would make if we were not going to increase the production.

flash here

UN Global Pulse – The voices of the vulnerable

My entry for the UN Global Pulse – Visualizing the voices of the vulnerable challenge on visualizing.org.

Optimized for HTML5 supporting browsers, specially Firefox. In Safari browser the arrows don’t work well, please scroll with your mouse instead.

View the visualization.

More information:

In the – Country’s Economy vs Meeting your Household Needs – graphs, I showed also the relationships between those answers. This might give us a clue of the relevance of the answers, because those who answered that the economy is much worse but they do better at their household might have a reason not related to the global crises for doing better, or were too subjective.

The part about – Relevant things that people talk about – tries to capture the pulse of the surveyed people about dealing with the household problems and about their quality of life (I chose to treat these to questions together as the answers completed each other in very many cases, the quality of life is also explored further in the graphs below this section). Many answers contained information about more than one issue, therefore they were included in many circles.
The whole graph is not a breakdown of what % of the population thinks or does, it’s actually more similar to a word cloud, it’s an issue cloud. Also, I have included some issues that appeared only few times but I believe some of them are relevant and may give important clues about what the majority talked about, but didn’t mentioned it.

A special case it’s Ukraine, where about 2 thirds mentioned the word “Change” with different attitudes, (from No change, to a change is highly needed, a change is visible) and many more talked about it with other words. Only few said “A change of power” or a “Change of government”, “Justice for the people”, although few, I believe they are very relevant and give “Change” a political meaning besides the economical one.

In order to make the wordclouds about the future, I had grouped together similar words (like change and changing), treated as an expression groups of few words that had a meaning like that, and regarding the answers that were phrases with many words, I had included them in the one word that summed up best the phrase (not necessary written in the phrase, but had the meaning of the phrase). For example, in India, many people told what profession they want to have in future, I grouped them as “profession” so that their plans about careers would show up in the cloud.

The Nuclear Radiation Chart

This “chart” shows the nuclear radiation data, and tries to explain the relationship between the numbers about radiation known to the public (right side of the triangle), from the media, such as 400mSv/hour recorded at Fukushima nuclear plant in 15 March, or 2mSv/year, the background radiation experienced by everyone and the same numbers but compared at the same unit (not per hour/year/instant/lifetime) – this is the radiation rate, which shows how many times more than normal the radiation is (left side of the triangle).
Then, by having the chart arranged in a triangle, with the timeline at the bottom, the chart tries to give a clearer view on this issue.

I made this chart in collaboration with Fabian Fucci, who has explained me this subject, stressed upon the role of the comparison which he made and the challenge of having it shown into 1 piece.

For more information, you can also read an article on visualizing.org which explains very well this chart.


Nuclear Radiation - Triangle Chart

 

The Paper Pie Chart on Paper

A pie chart about paper made from paper :) .

the paper pie chart

the paper pie chart - detail